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Sunsets and Meteors - a series of scrolls, of multiple worlds.

Sunsets and Meteors - a series of scrolls, of multiple worlds.

Paintings scrolls, jars of ancient fossilized plants, meteor dust, bone, gold & oil paint on calf skin. - a series of scrolls, of multiple worlds.

Each recalls events in the evolution of life through a vast expanse of time - from the origins of plants, the shifting of tectonic plates, to the extinction of the Jurassic period triggered by a falling meteorite.

This latest work, a collaborative project with The programme for Experimental Atmospheres and Climate at UCD, has evolved by responding to ideas based on their research. In particular, how changes in atmospheric O2 and CO2 concentration have influenced the timing of key evolutionary shifts by observing the success of various plant groups throughout geological time. Professor Jenny McElwain has created atmospheres from as far back as 400 million years ago. By observing these sealed bottles or chambers of ‘atmospheres’ I have tried to visualize their essential ‘nature’ that though invisible to the eye, appears to emanate from their wondrously gaseous, presence. To me, these vessels act as imaginary portals into the temporal states of existences and dimensions beyond explanation, scientific or otherwise,[1] leading to other questions:

 If I were an observer sitting on a rock in Donegal millions of years ago, how would the sunsets have looked?

 The investigations began from conversations with  physicists about how  volcanic events have influenced the colours of the sunset over the last 50 million years. It led me to consider how the colour spectrum influences our perceptions of place and time.

 These ideas fed into the work. Sunset and Meteors - a series of scrolls, of multiple worlds. Each recall events in the evolution of life through a vast expanse of time - from the origins of plants, the shifting of  tectonic plates, to the extinction of the Jurassic period triggered by a falling meteorite.

'Continum,' Smoke drawings and photo installation.

'Continum,' Smoke drawings and photo installation.

Siobhan McDonald 2014

Invisible Atmosphere

Invisible Atmosphere

Oil on board

Siobhan McDonald 2013

'Every contact leaves a trace,' 50 million year old charcoal (from a forest flash fire in Greenland) and bone on paper 120 x 150 cm © Siobhan McDonald 2015

'Every contact leaves a trace,' 50 million year old charcoal (from a forest flash fire in Greenland) and bone on paper 120 x 150 cm © Siobhan McDonald 2015

 

Welcome Disturbances

Dublin City Council, Arts Office, The LAB, Foley Street, Dublin 1 -Exhibition continues until 11 April, 2015

 In Every contact leaves a trace I worked with 50 million year old charcoal gathered from the charred remains of a forest flash fire in Greenland. Part of this work was to connect with the ecological event and resurrect the fire, through a series of drawings made from the charcoal. What has been destroyed can be recreated as something new, something that may at this time seem unfamiliar. Art, like life, is fleeting and transient, but in these works I try to consider something beyond ‘us’ as humans. Life perhaps will be infinite, but in an altered state of matter in another time and space.

A group exhibition of new work by Cindy Cummings, David Stalling, Sofie Loscher, Maeve O’ Connor, Emma Finucan, Siobhan McDonald, Mark Cullen. This group exhibition shows the diverse practices of recipients of the UCD Science Artist in Residence Award. 

 

 

ANIMA

ANIMA

 Glacier drawing 205

50 million year old charcoal gathered from the charred remains of a forest flash fire in Greenland and smoke on Japanese rice paper.

Sunsets and Meteors - a series of scrolls, of multiple worlds.

Paintings scrolls, jars of ancient fossilized plants, meteor dust, bone, gold & oil paint on calf skin. - a series of scrolls, of multiple worlds.

Each recalls events in the evolution of life through a vast expanse of time - from the origins of plants, the shifting of tectonic plates, to the extinction of the Jurassic period triggered by a falling meteorite.

This latest work, a collaborative project with The programme for Experimental Atmospheres and Climate at UCD, has evolved by responding to ideas based on their research. In particular, how changes in atmospheric O2 and CO2 concentration have influenced the timing of key evolutionary shifts by observing the success of various plant groups throughout geological time. Professor Jenny McElwain has created atmospheres from as far back as 400 million years ago. By observing these sealed bottles or chambers of ‘atmospheres’ I have tried to visualize their essential ‘nature’ that though invisible to the eye, appears to emanate from their wondrously gaseous, presence. To me, these vessels act as imaginary portals into the temporal states of existences and dimensions beyond explanation, scientific or otherwise,[1] leading to other questions:

 If I were an observer sitting on a rock in Donegal millions of years ago, how would the sunsets have looked?

 The investigations began from conversations with  physicists about how  volcanic events have influenced the colours of the sunset over the last 50 million years. It led me to consider how the colour spectrum influences our perceptions of place and time.

 These ideas fed into the work. Sunset and Meteors - a series of scrolls, of multiple worlds. Each recall events in the evolution of life through a vast expanse of time - from the origins of plants, the shifting of  tectonic plates, to the extinction of the Jurassic period triggered by a falling meteorite.

'Continum,' Smoke drawings and photo installation.

Siobhan McDonald 2014

Invisible Atmosphere

Oil on board

Siobhan McDonald 2013

'Every contact leaves a trace,' 50 million year old charcoal (from a forest flash fire in Greenland) and bone on paper 120 x 150 cm © Siobhan McDonald 2015

 

Welcome Disturbances

Dublin City Council, Arts Office, The LAB, Foley Street, Dublin 1 -Exhibition continues until 11 April, 2015

 In Every contact leaves a trace I worked with 50 million year old charcoal gathered from the charred remains of a forest flash fire in Greenland. Part of this work was to connect with the ecological event and resurrect the fire, through a series of drawings made from the charcoal. What has been destroyed can be recreated as something new, something that may at this time seem unfamiliar. Art, like life, is fleeting and transient, but in these works I try to consider something beyond ‘us’ as humans. Life perhaps will be infinite, but in an altered state of matter in another time and space.

A group exhibition of new work by Cindy Cummings, David Stalling, Sofie Loscher, Maeve O’ Connor, Emma Finucan, Siobhan McDonald, Mark Cullen. This group exhibition shows the diverse practices of recipients of the UCD Science Artist in Residence Award. 

 

 

ANIMA

 Glacier drawing 205

50 million year old charcoal gathered from the charred remains of a forest flash fire in Greenland and smoke on Japanese rice paper.

Sunsets and Meteors - a series of scrolls, of multiple worlds.
'Continum,' Smoke drawings and photo installation.
Invisible Atmosphere
'Every contact leaves a trace,' 50 million year old charcoal (from a forest flash fire in Greenland) and bone on paper 120 x 150 cm © Siobhan McDonald 2015
ANIMA